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Australian women share red flags at job interviews that should have warned them to decline an offer

Australian women have revealed the red flags they missed at job interviews that should have warned them to decline an offer. 

Eleven professionals across a range of industries from corporate finance to hospitality shared their lessons anonymously with Mamamia, advising others of the signs to watch for to avoid accepting the wrong role.

Sexual innuendo and failure to discuss pay were among the most commonly overlooked, along with rude comments about appearance and a negative atmosphere in the workplace.

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Australian women have revealed the red flags they missed at job interviews that should have warned them to decline an offer (stock image)

Australian women have revealed the red flags they missed at job interviews that should have warned them to decline an offer (stock image)

Australian women have revealed the red flags they missed at job interviews that should have warned them to decline an offer (stock image)

Inappropriate comments

A woman recalled interviewing for a part-time job at a pizza restaurant when she was 17 years old.

The male owner, who gave her ‘massively pervy vibes’, hired her on the spot. 

As she signed the contract, she overheard a female manager remark: ‘He always hires the pretty blonde ones.’

The woman said she should have taken that comment as a warning to walk away from the job then and there because the owner sexually harassed her from her first day, calling her ‘sexy’ and openly asking other staff if they would sleep with her.

Another woman who applied for a waitress position at an Italian restaurant when she was about 19 said the manager stared at her breasts ‘the entire interview’.

She said she felt so uncomfortable she downplayed her experience during the chat and was ‘so relieved’ when she didn’t get the job. 

How to write the perfect resume

– Do not include a photo or date of birth.

– Keep it short. It should only be one page in length, or a maximum of two if you are in a senior position.

– To impress ‘D’ personalities (typically MDs and CEOs), and ‘Cs’, such as CFOs, use clear headings and bulleted sections, written in a simple, consistent font such as Arial or Times New Roman, size 11 or 12. This makes it easy to comprehend for ‘Ds’, who tend to skim read, while also including the structure and consistency that ‘Cs’ look for.

– Keep sentences short and concise, and give proof supporting your career achievements. This appeals to ‘D’ and ‘I’ types who want facts and statistics, and ‘S’ and ‘Cs’ who are put off by excessive self-promotion.

– List your work history in chronological order.

– Impress recruiters by referring to their company’s values in at least one of your career achievements.

– Ditch stock phrases like ‘I’m a good team player’ and ‘I enjoy spending time with my family and friends’ 

– Give at least one example of how you are motivated, and how you have and will motivate others.

– Mention two activities that demonstrate your personal values. This could be charity work (fundraising by running a marathon, for instance).

– Use positive language throughout that indicates a ‘can-do’ attitude.

Source: London recruitment coach Rita Chowdhry

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Unusual requests and negative vibes

A 25-year-old graduate who made it to the second round of interviews at a consulting firm said she was surprised when the hiring manager asked her to meet after work hours.

When she found the office in darkness, she called the manager who told her she was supposed to meet him in a cafe in a different neighbourhood. 

Flustered and confused, she raced there only to find him ‘completely self-centered’ throughout their conversation, which focused more on his achievements, his family and his interests than her skills or suitability for the job.

This woman did decline the offer, but was incredulous when she received a ‘very nasty’ email from the ‘self-centered’ manager telling her she had ‘wasted his time’.

No mention of pay 

A young woman who worked a trial shift at a cafe said she received no guidance about what was expected from her – or the wages she was entitled to.

She said the manager kept asking her to come back the following day, unpaid, and ended up working a full week of shifts for free before he told her she was unsuitable for the role.

‘He then went to the tip jar and picked out a $5 note and handed it to me. That was the pay,’ she said.

Source: Daily Mail Australia | World News

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