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Australians to brace themselves for La Nina rainfall and weather forecast for the next five days

Australians should brace themselves for more wet weather ahead as La Niña conditions continue well into the autumn. 

The country has shivered through its coolest and wettest summer in five years but experts said there will be no sign of a reprieve in the coming months.  

Bureau of Meteorology climatologist Dr Andrew Watkins said the atmospheric phenomenon will keep the rain falling in March and April – particularly on the eastern coast. 

Australians should brace themselves for wet months ahead with La Niña conditions to continue well into the autumn months. Pictured: Man runs past Sydney Harbour Bridge 2020

Australians should brace themselves for wet months ahead with La Niña conditions to continue well into the autumn months. Pictured: Man runs past Sydney Harbour Bridge 2020

Australians should brace themselves for wet months ahead with La Niña conditions to continue well into the autumn months. Pictured: Man runs past Sydney Harbour Bridge 2020

Temperatures this summer have been the coolest since 2012 – only rising above average in Queensland and the west coast of Western Australia.  

December was the third wettest December since national records began in 1900, said Dr Andrew Watkins, a senior climatologist from the Bureau of Meteorology. 

And bad news for Sydneysiders, rain is expected to continue into Autumn. 

‘Autumn rainfall is expected to be wetter than average across large Eastern parts of Australia particularly in March and April’, Dr Watkins said.  

Above average rainfall is also expected in dry areas of Queensland, while the rest of Australia will enjoy generally normal levels of rainfall.   

The official autumn bushfire outlook predicts most of the country can expect average fire conditions this autumn. 

The autumn outlook suggests a high likelihood of exceeding rainfall on the east coast. Pictured: BOM outlook

The autumn outlook suggests a high likelihood of exceeding rainfall on the east coast. Pictured: BOM outlook

The autumn outlook suggests a high likelihood of exceeding rainfall on the east coast. Pictured: BOM outlook

Risk of wide spread flooding is highest for eastern and northern Australia. Pictured: Flooding of Daly River in the Northern Territory in 2018

Risk of wide spread flooding is highest for eastern and northern Australia. Pictured: Flooding of Daly River in the Northern Territory in 2018

Risk of wide spread flooding is highest for eastern and northern Australia. Pictured: Flooding of Daly River in the Northern Territory in 2018

Parts of coastal Queensland still have above average normal bush fire potential, with bush fire risks to also remain for parts of Western Australia this autumn. 

South Western Australia is one of the few places with ‘above normal’ fire severity for December to February due to a rainfall deficit in the winter and spring. 

Eastern Victoria and northern Queensland show below normal bush fire potential, largely due to a wetter landscape.  

La Niña Autumn Summary

Above average rainfall for eastern and northern parts of Australia

Warmer than average days in northern Australia

High and near median stream-flows likely

Increased risk of flooding in the east and north 

Source: Bureau of Meteorology  

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Parts of coastal Queensland still have above average normal bush fire potential, with bush fire risks to also remain for parts of Western Australia. Pictured: Fraser Island fire from Dec 2020

Parts of coastal Queensland still have above average normal bush fire potential, with bush fire risks to also remain for parts of Western Australia. Pictured: Fraser Island fire from Dec 2020

Parts of coastal Queensland still have above average normal bush fire potential, with bush fire risks to also remain for parts of Western Australia. Pictured: Fraser Island fire from Dec 2020

FIVE DAY WEATHER IN YOUR CITY 

SYDNEY      

SATURDAY: Min 19. Max 26. Possible shower. 

SUNDAY: Min 20. Max 28. Partly cloudy.

MONDAY: Min 20. Max 31. Mostly sunny.

TUESDAY: Min 19. Max 25. Possible shower.

WEDNESDAY: Min 17. Max 23. Shower or two.

BRISBANE        

SATURDAY: Min 23. Max 31. Partly cloudy.

SUNDAY: Min 23. Max 31. Partly cloudy.

MONDAY: Min 23. Max 32. Partly cloudy.

TUESDAY: Min 23. Max 34. Possible shower.

WEDNESDAY: Min 23. Max 29. Shower or two. 

ADELAIDE      

SATURDAY: Min 13. Max 28. Sunny.

SUNDAY: Min 15. Max 27. Sunny.

MONDAY: Min 14. Max 26. Partly cloudy.

TUESDAY: Min 13. Max 24. Partly cloudy.

WEDNESDAY: Min 12. Max 25. Mostly sunny.

CANBERRA  

SATURDAY: Min 12. Max 26. Partly cloudy.

SUNDAY: Min 12. Max 20. Sunny.

MONDAY: Min 13. Max 31. Sunny.

TUESDAY: Min 13. Max 25. Partly cloudy.

WEDNESDAY: Min 10. Max 24. Partly cloudy. 

MELBOURNE      

SATURDAY: Min 11. Max 21. Partly cloudy.

SUNDAY: Min 12. Max 298 Mostly sunny.

MONDAY: Min 15. Max 21. Partly cloudy.

TUESDAY: Min 12. Max 17. Cloudy.

WEDNESDAY: Min 12. Max 18. Partly cloudy.

PERTH      

SATURDAY: Min 17. Max 31. Mostly sunny.

SUNDAY: Min 17. Max 31. Partly cloudy.

MONDAY: Min 17. Max 28. Partly cloudy.

TUESDAY: Min 17. Max 27. Partly cloudy.

WEDNESDAY: Min 19. Max 27. Partly cloudy. 

HOBART      

SATURDAY: Min 10. Max 20. Partly cloudy.

SUNDAY: Min 12. Max 22. Partly cloudy.

MONDAY: Min 14. Max 22. Showers easing.

TUESDAY: Min 9. Max 16. Windy. Cloudy.

WEDNESDAY: Min 9. Max 19. Cloudy. 

DARWIN      

SATURDAY: Min 25. Max 33. Partly cloudy.

SUNDAY: Min 25. Max 33. Partly cloudy. 

MONDAY: Min 25. Max 33. Partly cloudy.

TUESDAY: Min 25. Max 32. Partly cloudy.

WEDNESDAY: Min 25. Max 32. Partly cloudy. 

Source: Bureau of Meteorology 

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Autumn days are expected to be warmer than average across Northern Australia, Tasmania and far western parts of Western Australia but cooler in parts of New South Wales.

Above-average minimum temperatures will continue across most of the country, with the exception of central and western South Australia and south-eastern Western Australia. 

Daytime temperatures are expected to be above average for the far north and south as well as the far west.  

The rest of Australia will experience neutral temperatures, except a chance of below average maximum temperatures for inland New South Wales.  

The risk of widespread flooding is highest for eastern and northern Australia, where soils and catchments are already wet and are likely to see above average rainfall. 

WHAT IS THE EL NINO PHENOMENON IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN?

El Niño and La Niña are the warm and cool phases (respectively) of a recurring climate phenomenon across the tropical Pacific – the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, or ‘ENSO’ for short.

The pattern can shift back and forth irregularly every two to seven years, and each phase triggers predictable disruptions of temperature, winds and precipitation. 

These changes disrupt air movement and affect global climate. 

ENSO has three phases it can be: 

  • El Niño: A warming of the ocean surface, or above-average sea surface temperatures (SST), in the central and eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Over Indonesia, rainfall becomes reduced while rainfall increases over the tropical Pacific Ocean. The low-level surface winds, which normally blow from east to west along the equator, instead weaken or, in some cases, start blowing the other direction from west to east. 
  • La Niña: A cooling of the ocean surface, or below-average sea surface temperatures (SST), in the central and eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Over Indonesia, rainfall tends to increase while rainfall decreases over the central tropical Pacific Ocean. The normal easterly winds along the equator become even stronger.
  • Neutral: Neither El Niño or La Niña. Often tropical Pacific SSTs are generally close to average.
Maps showing the most commonly experienced impacts related to El Niño ('warm episode,' top) and La Niña ('cold episode,' bottom) during the period December to February, when both phenomena tend to be at their strongest

Maps showing the most commonly experienced impacts related to El Niño ('warm episode,' top) and La Niña ('cold episode,' bottom) during the period December to February, when both phenomena tend to be at their strongest

Maps showing the most commonly experienced impacts related to El Niño (‘warm episode,’ top) and La Niña (‘cold episode,’ bottom) during the period December to February, when both phenomena tend to be at their strongest

Source: Climate.gov

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Source: Daily Mail Australia | World News

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