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Child sends letter to Australian Federal Police, calling for them to invest in her clever invention

A young girl has sent an adorable letter to the Australian Federal Police, calling for them to invest in her ‘invisibility cloak’ invention. 

Tessa from Western Australia wrote the letter to AFP Chief Technology Officer Jonathan Coleman on August 5, pitching the invention, which she called the ‘Invisamore’. 

The AFP posted pictures of the letter to Twitter on Friday, thanking Tessa for sending the pitch to them.

Tessa from WA sent the letter to AFP Chief Technology Officer Jonathan Coleman on August 5, pitching the invisibility cloak invention (pictured), which she called the 'Invisamore'.

Tessa from WA sent the letter to AFP Chief Technology Officer Jonathan Coleman on August 5, pitching the invisibility cloak invention (pictured), which she called the 'Invisamore'.

Tessa from WA sent the letter to AFP Chief Technology Officer Jonathan Coleman on August 5, pitching the invisibility cloak invention (pictured), which she called the ‘Invisamore’.

‘Dear Mr Coleman, can you see me? Of course you can’t, it’s a letter,’ Tessa began the letter. 

‘But if I was there and my invention was real, you couldn’t. Want to know what it is? Well, keep reading. My invention is InvisaMore! (It’s an invisibility cloak).’ 

The young girl explained she was inspired by a ‘silly comment’ from her primary school teacher Ms Kim. 

Ms Kim had mentioned ‘magic doesn’t exist like an invisibility cloak’, which prompted Tessa to think about a time she was shopping for a birthday present. 

The AFP posted pictures of the letter (pictured) to Twitter on Friday, thanking Tessa for sending the pitch to them

The AFP posted pictures of the letter (pictured) to Twitter on Friday, thanking Tessa for sending the pitch to them

The AFP posted pictures of the letter (pictured) to Twitter on Friday, thanking Tessa for sending the pitch to them

She came across a cloak that appeared invisible when filmed through a virtual reality smartphone application, which led Tessa to invent the ‘InvisaMore’. 

Tessa also included a helpful diagram that demonstrated how the InvisaMore invisibility cloak worked.  

It is made up of tiny cameras connected to screens, which project the image of what’s behind you to create the illusion of invisibility. 

She may not have known it, but Tessa was describing the concept of active optical camouflage, which only exists in theory and in proof-of-concept prototypes.

Tessa sent the letter to the AFP in hopes that they would invest in her invisibility cloak invention. She said it would reduce theft and could be used to go undercover (stock image)

Tessa sent the letter to the AFP in hopes that they would invest in her invisibility cloak invention. She said it would reduce theft and could be used to go undercover (stock image)

Tessa sent the letter to the AFP in hopes that they would invest in her invisibility cloak invention. She said it would reduce theft and could be used to go undercover (stock image)

Tessa requested some capital from the AFP to get her expensive tech project off the ground. 

‘I was hoping you could invest in my invention,’ she wrote. 

‘In WA alone, 421,394 items have been stolen. With my invention, I bet we can get that number down to 200 and maybe zero. And it can help lots with undercover work if you invest. Thanks for hearing me out, I would love a reply.’

Invisibility cloaks were popularised by the Harry Potter series, in which characters would use the cloak to sneak around undetected. 

Cloaking devices also regularly appear in sci-fi movies such as Star Wars but are looking closer to reality due to developments in military technology. 

Last year, Canadian company HyperStealth Biotechnology patented its paper-thin ‘Quantum Stealth’ material, which bends light around an object to make it vanish. 

TESSA’S FULL LETTER TO THE AFP 

Dear Mr Coleman, 

Can you see me? Of course you can’t, it’s a letter. But if I was there and my invention was real, you couldn’t. Want to know what it is? Well, keep reading. My invention is InvisaMore! (it’s an invisibility cloak).

I got the idea when Ms Kim (my teacher) said don’t do anything magical because magic doesn’t exist like an invisibility cloak (just a silly comment). That got me thinking about the time I went shopping for a birthday present. I saw a cloak that when you bought an app and looked through the screen, the cloak would seem invisible and that helped with coming up with my invention.

I was hoping you could invest in my invention. In WA alone, 421,394 items have been stolen. With my invention, I bet we can get that number down to 200 and maybe zero. And it can help lots with undercover work if you invest. Thanks for hearing me out, I would love a reply. 

Yours sincerely, 

Tessa 

August 5, 2020 

 

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Source: Daily Mail Australia | World News

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