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Classic knock-knock joke may be consigned to history as 20% of Millennials have no idea what gag is

The classic knock-knock joke may soon be consigned to history as 20 per cent of Millennials say they have no idea what the gag is, according to a survey. 

The study found that one in five Britons aged under 30 are clueless about the jokes, which have have been around since the 16th century.

A further 75 per cent of all ages agreed they are a bit old fashioned and not as funny as they used to be.  

But 53 per cent of the 2,000 people surveyed said that, sometimes a joke is so bad, it is actually funny.

A study by insights agency Perspectus Global found that one in five Britons aged under 30 are clueless about the jokes, which have have been around since the 16th century (file photo)

A study by insights agency Perspectus Global found that one in five Britons aged under 30 are clueless about the jokes, which have have been around since the 16th century (file photo)

A study by insights agency Perspectus Global found that one in five Britons aged under 30 are clueless about the jokes, which have have been around since the 16th century (file photo)

The poll by insights agency Perspectus Global also discovered a quarter (26 per cent) of over 50s feel sad that old jokes have fallen by the wayside. 

As many as 18 per cent think that humorous content on social media has changed what Britons find funny as a nation.

The data further revealed a list of the worst knock knock jokes with ‘Knock, knock. Who’s there? Cash. Cash who? No thanks, I’m allergic to nuts’ coming top.

However, a third of residents in Nottingham said they still found the old-fashioned jokes hilarious. 

David Arnold from Perspectus Global said: ‘The classic knock-knock joke is part of our national heritage. 

‘However funny or unfunny they may be, they still have the ability to put a much needed smile on our faces. 

Knock-knock jokes have played a long role in British life, with most experts believing they originated from William Shakespeare (portrait above)

Knock-knock jokes have played a long role in British life, with most experts believing they originated from William Shakespeare (portrait above)

Knock-knock jokes have played a long role in British life, with most experts believing they originated from William Shakespeare (portrait above)

‘It would be sad if they were consigned to the joke book of history.’ 

Knock-knock jokes have played a long role in British life, with most experts believing they originated from William Shakespeare, who conjured up many famous phrases, sayings, insults and jokes.

The quip first appeared in a monologue from Macbeth in 1606 and the entertainment magazine Variety reported in August 1936 that a ‘knock-knock craze’ was sweeping America.

A few months later, a British actor and comedian named Wee Georgie Wood started telling knock-knock jokes in the UK.  

The worst knock-knock jokes, according to Britons

1. Knock, knock. Who’s there? Cash. Cash who? No thanks, i’m allergic to nuts (53 per cent)

2. Knock, knock. Who’s there? Tank. Tank who? You’re welcome (49 per cent)

3. Knock, knock? Who’s there? Little old lady. Little old lady who? I didn’t know you could yodel (46 per cent)

4. Knock, knock. Who’s there? Dishes. Dishes who? Dishes the Police, come out with your hands up (35 per cent)

5. Knock, knock. Who’s there? Stopwatch. Stopwatcha doing and open the door (32 per cent)

6. Knock, knock. Who’s there? Howard. Howard who? Howard, I know? Just open the door (26 per cent)

7. Knock, knock. Who’s there? Cows go. Cows go who? No cows go moo (24 per cent)

8. Knock, knock. Lettuce. Lettuce who? Lettuce in it’s cold outside (20 per cent)

9. Knock, knock. Who’s there? Nun. Nun, who? Nun of your business (18 per cent)

10. Knock, knock. Who’s there? Alex. Alex who? Alex-plain when you let me in (14 per cent)

11. Knock, knock. Who’s there? Twit. Twit who? Did anyone else hear an owl? (13 per cent)

12. Knock, knock. Who’s there? Kanga. Kanga-who? No, it’s a Kangaroo (11 per cent)

13. Knock, knock. Who’s there. Isabel. Isabel who? Isabel working as I had to knock? (10 per cent)

14. Knock, knock. Who’s there? Alpaca who? Alpaca the suitcase and you load the car (9 per cent)

15. Knock, knock. Who’s there? Ya. Ya who? No thanks, I prefer Google (8 per cent)

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