A new slimming jab can help people shed a quarter of their body weight, making it the most effective yet.

Trials of the drug – dubbed the ‘Godzilla’ of appetite-suppressing medicines – helped people lose an average of 24 per cent of their body weight in less than a year.

Unlike other drugs, retatrutide not only suppresses the appetite but also speeds up the metabolism.

This helped it outperform jabs Wegovy, Ozempic and Mounjaro, currently being sold around the world in their millions.

Trials show it helped people with obesity shed 4st 3lbs on average in just 48 weeks.

Trials for retatrutide dubbed the 'Godzilla' of appetite-suppressing medicines – helped people lose an average of 24 per cent of their body weight in less than a year, outperforming jabs like Wegovy, Ozempic and Mounjaro, currently being sold around the world in their millions

Trials for retatrutide dubbed the 'Godzilla' of appetite-suppressing medicines – helped people lose an average of 24 per cent of their body weight in less than a year, outperforming jabs like Wegovy, Ozempic and Mounjaro, currently being sold around the world in their millions

Trials for retatrutide dubbed the ‘Godzilla’ of appetite-suppressing medicines – helped people lose an average of 24 per cent of their body weight in less than a year, outperforming jabs like Wegovy, Ozempic and Mounjaro, currently being sold around the world in their millions

The results were even more stark in women, helping them lose 28.5 per cent of their body weight, compared to 21.2 per cent in men.

Presenting their findings at the European Obesity Congress in Venice, Dr Ania Jastreboff, director of the Yale Obesity Research Centre, said: ‘The results are striking.

‘In a phase two trial, this degree of weight reduction in in this this time frame has not been seen.’

Weight loss jabs currently being prescribed on the NHS and sold privately slow digestion and reduce appetite by mimicking hormones which regulate hunger and feelings of fullness.

They are designed to act like one of these hormones, known as glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1).

The two biggest selling drugs are branded as Wegovy or Ozempic which both contain the same key ingredient semaglutide, at different doses.

Originally designed to tackle type 2 diabetes, it was repurposed for obesity and trials showed its stronger dose form could help users lose 15 per cent of their body weight in 68 weeks.

Mounjaro followed which, as well as mimicking GLP-1, also targeted a hormone called GIP to boost its effect on appetite suppression.

Trials showed it could help obese people lose 22.5 per cent of their body weight in 72 weeks, at the highest dose of 15mg.

While these are approved, the phase 2 trials of retatrutide show its impact on weight loss could be the biggest yet.

Its study of 338 obese people, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, saw participants lose 24 per cent of body weight over a 48-week period.

Experts believe given longer on the drug could help users shed as much as 30 per cent.

More obese participants lost an even greater percentage of their body weight at 26.5 per cent in 48 weeks. Unusually, 100 per cent of trial participants lost at least 5 per cent.

As well as GLP-1 and GIP hormones, retatrutide targets a third hormone known as glucagon which triggers the body to burn more fat when we move.’

Professor Alex Miras, obesity expert at Ulster University, said: ‘It is basically Mounjaro but turbocharged.

‘What glucagon does is it increases energy expenditure – so the amount of energy that you burn.

‘So there are two mechanisms; decreasing food intake and increasing energy expenditure. Up until now all of the medications have just focused on reducing food intake.’

Like all previous GLP-1 drugs, retatrutide has led to side effects including nausea, diarrhoea and constipation.

Larger trials are now underway with results due in 2026, when it could be approved for use on the NHS.

Professor Naveed Sattar, of Glasgow University, who has worked on trials of other weight loss jabs, said: ‘Five or ten years ago we could never have imagined drugs that would cause this kind of weight loss.

‘The trial suggests retatrutide still hadn’t plateaued so it’s probably going to see more weight loss.

‘If we give this drug for even longer I think it could reach nearly 30 per cent of someone’s body weight.

‘That’s a heck of a lot of weight. The question is can this be done safely and there are big trials planned to test that.’

Nadia Ahmad, Eli Lilly’s Associate Vice President for Obesity, said: ‘We’re very excited about the level of weight loss retatrutide has achieved by activating three receptors, which makes it different to those currently on the market.’

Source: Mail Online

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