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Polar bear cubs frolic in the snow

A photographer has captured beautiful photos of a mother polar bear and her playful cubs frolicking in the snow as they make their way to the sea to hunt after hibernation.

Brian Matthews, 42, from North East England, Durham has captured the magnificent wildlife scene of a protective marine mammal guarding her babies as they prance around in a blanket of snow.

The photographer ventured into Wapusk National Park, around 30 miles south of Churchill, Manitoba in Canada, to snap the incredible shots earlier this month.

Brian Matthews, 42, from North East England, Durham has captured the magnificent wildlife scene of a protective marine mammal guarding her babies as they prance around in a blanket of snow

Brian Matthews, 42, from North East England, Durham has captured the magnificent wildlife scene of a protective marine mammal guarding her babies as they prance around in a blanket of snow

Brian Matthews, 42, from North East England, Durham has captured the magnificent wildlife scene of a protective marine mammal guarding her babies as they prance around in a blanket of snow

The photographer ventured into Wapusk National Park, around 30 miles south of Churchill, Manitoba in Canada, to snap the incredible shots earlier this month

The photographer ventured into Wapusk National Park, around 30 miles south of Churchill, Manitoba in Canada, to snap the incredible shots earlier this month

The photographer ventured into Wapusk National Park, around 30 miles south of Churchill, Manitoba in Canada, to snap the incredible shots earlier this month 

Alongside his team, Mr Matthews spent up to 12 hours tracking and observing the bears in temperatures as low as -65°C with strong, chilly winds

Alongside his team, Mr Matthews spent up to 12 hours tracking and observing the bears in temperatures as low as -65°C with strong, chilly winds

Alongside his team, Mr Matthews spent up to 12 hours tracking and observing the bears in temperatures as low as -65°C with strong, chilly winds

Alongside his team, Mr Matthews spent up to 12 hours tracking and observing the bears in temperatures as low as -65°C with strong, chilly winds.

He came across polar bear cubs and quickly snapped several shots of the marine mammals with their mother.

The cubs were building up the strength to walk across the ice to the sea so their mum could hunt and eat for the first time after hibernating for six months.

‘Each day we spent 12 hours on the tundra tracking, observing and photographing the bears,’ Mr Mathews told Jam Press.

‘The conditions are harsh, with low temperatures, and the lowest recorded was -65°C with wind chill and very strong winds across the tundra, which makes photography difficult.

‘The bears have just come out of their dens and the cubs are tiny but quickly have to get strong enough to walk 35 miles to Hudson Bay so their mothers can hunt and eat for the first time in six months.

‘The cubs in the photos were building up their strength playing and trying to keep warm while the mother wasn’t bothered by the cold – they would often fall asleep in front of us, letting the drifting snow entomb them.’

He said: 'The bears have just come out of their dens and the cubs are tiny but quickly have to get strong enough to walk 35 miles to Hudson Bay so their mothers can hunt and eat for the first time in six months'

He said: 'The bears have just come out of their dens and the cubs are tiny but quickly have to get strong enough to walk 35 miles to Hudson Bay so their mothers can hunt and eat for the first time in six months'

He said: ‘The bears have just come out of their dens and the cubs are tiny but quickly have to get strong enough to walk 35 miles to Hudson Bay so their mothers can hunt and eat for the first time in six months’

Mr Mathews has always enjoyed the outdoors and watching wildlife, purchasing his first camera in 2001

Mr Mathews has always enjoyed the outdoors and watching wildlife, purchasing his first camera in 2001

Mr Mathews has always enjoyed the outdoors and watching wildlife, purchasing his first camera in 2001

Mr Mathews said: 'I've been a photographer since 2003, I do mainly wildlife and conservation photography

Mr Mathews said: 'I've been a photographer since 2003, I do mainly wildlife and conservation photography

Mr Mathews said: ‘I’ve been a photographer since 2003, I do mainly wildlife and conservation photography

Mr Matthews has always enjoyed the outdoors and watching wildlife, purchasing his first camera in 2001.

The 42-year-old has travelled to over 50 countries snapping images of all types of animals in their natural habitats.

Mr Matthews said: ‘I’ve been a photographer since 2003, I do mainly wildlife and conservation photography.

‘I’ve always enjoyed the outdoors and wildlife, starting with bird-watching as a kid.

‘I bought a camera while I was travelling in 2001 and not looked back since.

‘I love finding wildlife in their natural habitat and spending time with the people that work with them along the way.

‘I’ve travelled to over 50 countries but love photographing badgers here in the UK.

‘I’ve seen tigers, elephants, penguins, jaguars, leopards and thousands of birds so it’s hard to pick a favourite but I really like watching and photographing elephants or freediving with humpback whales in Tonga.’

He said: 'I love finding wildlife in their natural habitat and spending time with the people that work with them along the way'

He said: 'I love finding wildlife in their natural habitat and spending time with the people that work with them along the way'

He said: ‘I love finding wildlife in their natural habitat and spending time with the people that work with them along the way’

He added: 'I've seen tigers, elephants, penguins, jaguars, leopards and thousands of birds so it's hard to pick a favourite but I really like watching and photographing elephants or freediving with humpback whales in Tonga'

He added: 'I've seen tigers, elephants, penguins, jaguars, leopards and thousands of birds so it's hard to pick a favourite but I really like watching and photographing elephants or freediving with humpback whales in Tonga'

He added: ‘I’ve seen tigers, elephants, penguins, jaguars, leopards and thousands of birds so it’s hard to pick a favourite but I really like watching and photographing elephants or freediving with humpback whales in Tonga’

Mr Matthews said he has enjoyed taking photographs of animals ever since he was a young child

Mr Matthews said he has enjoyed taking photographs of animals ever since he was a young child

Mr Matthews said he has enjoyed taking photographs of animals ever since he was a young child

Source: Daily Mail Australia | World News

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