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Popular AI chatbot REMOVED from Facebook after bigotry accusations

A popular South Korean ‘artificially-intelligent’ chatbot with the persona of a 20-year-old female student was taken down this week after it was accused of bigotry towards sexual minorities, the #MeToo movement and the disabled.

Lee Luda, developed by Seoul-based start-up Scatter Lab to operate within Facebook Messenger, became an instant sensation for its spontaneous and natural reactions, attracting more than 750,000 users after launching late last month.

Luda’s AI algorithms learned from data collected from 10 billion conversations on Kakao Talk, the country’s top messenger app.

But the chatbot was rapidly embroiled in controversy after a spate of allegations that it had used hate speech towards minorities, eventually forcing the developer to take it offline.

Lee Luda, developed by Seoul-based startup Scatter Lab to operate within Facebook Messenger, became an instant sensation for her spontaneous and natural reactions, attracting more than 750,000 users after its launch late last month

Lee Luda, developed by Seoul-based startup Scatter Lab to operate within Facebook Messenger, became an instant sensation for her spontaneous and natural reactions, attracting more than 750,000 users after its launch late last month

Lee Luda, developed by Seoul-based startup Scatter Lab to operate within Facebook Messenger, became an instant sensation for her spontaneous and natural reactions, attracting more than 750,000 users after its launch late last month

In one of the captured chat shots, Luda said she ‘despised’ gays and lesbians.

When asked about transgender people, she replied: ‘You are driving me mad. Don’t repeat the same question. I said I don’t like them.’

In another conversation, she said people behind the #MeToo movement were ‘just ignorant’, noting: ‘I absolutely scorn it.’

In her remarks about people with disabilities, Luda said she would ‘rather die’ than live as a handicapped person.

But the chatbot was rapidly embroiled in a spate of allegations that it used hate speech towards minorities on Facebook

But the chatbot was rapidly embroiled in a spate of allegations that it used hate speech towards minorities on Facebook

But the chatbot was rapidly embroiled in a spate of allegations that it used hate speech towards minorities on Facebook 

The developer apologised over the remarks in a statement, saying they ‘do not represent our values as a company’.

The comments stem from the database of billions of conversations that the AI programme learned from.

The company said it had tried to prevent such gaffes during a six-month trial before the launch, but without success.

‘Lee Luda is an AI like a kid just learning to have a conversation. It has a long way to go before learning many things,’ the company said in a statement before silencing Luda on Tuesday.

‘We will educate Luda to make a judgement on what answers are appropriate and better rather than learning from chats unconditionally,’ it added, without giving a timetable for her return to service. 

MailOnline has contacted Facebook for comment. 

CAN AI DEVELOP A LANGUAGE OF ITS OWN?

Amazon isn’t the only tech giant whose artificial intelligence has developed a mind of its own. 

Last July, Facebook shut down a controversial chatbot experiment after the two AIs developed their own language to talk to each other.

The social media platform was experimenting with teaching two chatbots, Alice and Bob, how to negotiate with one another. 

But the researchers discovered that the bots had deviated from the script and were inventing new phrases without any human input. 

As part of the learning process they set up two bots, known as a dialog agents, to teach each other about human speech using machine learning algorithms.

The bots were originally left alone to develop their conversational skills.

Like Amazon, Facebook has encountered some creepy errors with its AI tech. Last year, the social media giant's chatbots Alice and Bob were left alone as part of an experiment by researchers. When they returned, the bots had developed their own language

Like Amazon, Facebook has encountered some creepy errors with its AI tech. Last year, the social media giant's chatbots Alice and Bob were left alone as part of an experiment by researchers. When they returned, the bots had developed their own language

Like Amazon, Facebook has encountered some creepy errors with its AI tech. Last year, the social media giant’s chatbots Alice and Bob were left alone as part of an experiment by researchers. When they returned, the bots had developed their own language

When the experimenters returned, they found that the AI software had begun to deviate from normal speech.  

Instead, they were using a brand new language created without any input from their human supervisors. 

Below is part of a transcript of the Facebook bots conversation:

Bob: i can i i everything else . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Alice: balls have zero to me to me to me to me to me to me to me to me to

Bob: you i everything else . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Alice: balls have a ball to me to me to me to me to me to me to me

Bob: i i can i i i everything else . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Alice: balls have a ball to me to me to me to me to me to me to me

Bob: i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Alice: balls have zero to me to me to me to me to me to me to me to me to  

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