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Relationship expert Dr Trisha Stratford reveals why she REALLY quit Married At First Sight

Dr Trisha Stratford has explosively revealed the real reason she left her role at Married At First Sight Australia. 

The psychologist, who was part of the show’s panel of relationship experts, also including John Aiken and Mel Schilling, announced her departure from the reality series in September. 

Speaking to Woman’s Day New Zealand this week, Trish said she felt ‘sick’ over the direction the show was taking and worried about the contestants’ mental health. 

Qualms: Dr Trisha Stratford (pictured) has revealed the real reason she left her role at Married At First Sight Australia. Speaking to Woman's Day New Zealand this week, Trish said she felt 'sick' over the direction the show was taking and worried about the contestants' mental health

Qualms: Dr Trisha Stratford (pictured) has revealed the real reason she left her role at Married At First Sight Australia. Speaking to Woman's Day New Zealand this week, Trish said she felt 'sick' over the direction the show was taking and worried about the contestants' mental health

 Qualms: Dr Trisha Stratford (pictured) has revealed the real reason she left her role at Married At First Sight Australia. Speaking to Woman’s Day New Zealand this week, Trish said she felt ‘sick’ over the direction the show was taking and worried about the contestants’ mental health

‘By the end, I couldn’t compromise my professional and personal standards because there were participants on the show who I felt shouldn’t have been there. 

‘If someone gets through the critical selection process, when we say we don’t want them on the show because they’re quite fragile, they’re not going to do well after the show,’ she said. 

The New Zealand-based therapist went on to say what the contestants go through is ‘a tough gig psychologically’ and she compared it to experiencing ‘conflict in war zones’.

Issues? 'By the end, I couldn't compromise my professional and personal standards because there were participants on the show who I felt shouldn't have been there,' she said. Pictured: Jessika Power

Issues? 'By the end, I couldn't compromise my professional and personal standards because there were participants on the show who I felt shouldn't have been there,' she said. Pictured: Jessika Power

Issues? ‘By the end, I couldn’t compromise my professional and personal standards because there were participants on the show who I felt shouldn’t have been there,’ she said. Pictured: Jessika Power 

Hard job? The New Zealand-based therapist went on to say what the contestants go through is 'a tough gig psychologically' and she compared it to experiencing 'conflict in war zones'. Pictured: Martha Kalifatidis and Michael Brunelli

Hard job? The New Zealand-based therapist went on to say what the contestants go through is 'a tough gig psychologically' and she compared it to experiencing 'conflict in war zones'. Pictured: Martha Kalifatidis and Michael Brunelli

Hard job? The New Zealand-based therapist went on to say what the contestants go through is ‘a tough gig psychologically’ and she compared it to experiencing ‘conflict in war zones’. Pictured: Martha Kalifatidis and Michael Brunelli

Upset: 'The participants we got in season six and seven were so outrageous and outside the norm that it wasn't what I signed up for. At a couple of dinner parties I felt sick. I felt in my guts that this wasn't what I'd want to be watching at home on TV,' Trish said. Pictured: Cyrell Paule

Upset: 'The participants we got in season six and seven were so outrageous and outside the norm that it wasn't what I signed up for. At a couple of dinner parties I felt sick. I felt in my guts that this wasn't what I'd want to be watching at home on TV,' Trish said. Pictured: Cyrell Paule

Upset: ‘The participants we got in season six and seven were so outrageous and outside the norm that it wasn’t what I signed up for. At a couple of dinner parties I felt sick. I felt in my guts that this wasn’t what I’d want to be watching at home on TV,’ Trish said. Pictured: Cyrell Paule

She added that the show changed from the ‘observational documentary’ she felt she had agreed to be part of. 

‘It got supersized, a bit like MasterChef, into what we know as MAFS now. The participants we got in season six and seven were so outrageous and outside the norm that it wasn’t what I signed up for. 

‘At a couple of dinner parties I felt sick. I felt in my guts that this wasn’t what I’d want to be watching at home on TV,’ Trish said. 

Daily Mail Australia has reached out to Channel Nine for comment.  

Goodbye: In September 2020, Dr Stratford confirmed that she had parted ways from Married At First Sight after seven seasons. She announced she was 'taking a step back from the series to focus on her writing, research and neuropsychotherapy'

Goodbye: In September 2020, Dr Stratford confirmed that she had parted ways from Married At First Sight after seven seasons. She announced she was 'taking a step back from the series to focus on her writing, research and neuropsychotherapy'

Goodbye: In September 2020, Dr Stratford confirmed that she had parted ways from Married At First Sight after seven seasons. She announced she was ‘taking a step back from the series to focus on her writing, research and neuropsychotherapy’

In September 2020, Dr Stratford confirmed that she had parted ways from Married At First Sight after seven seasons. 

In a statement on the show’s Instagram account, the relationship expert announced she was ‘taking a step back from the series to focus on her writing, research and neuropsychotherapy’.  

In response to her resignation from the role, a statement from the MAFS team read: ‘All our thanks to Trisha for the extraordinary contribution she has made to the success of #MAFS!’ 

In response to her resignation from the role, a statement from the MAFS team read: 'All our thanks to Trisha for the extraordinary contribution she has made to the success of #MAFS!'

In response to her resignation from the role, a statement from the MAFS team read: 'All our thanks to Trisha for the extraordinary contribution she has made to the success of #MAFS!'

In response to her resignation from the role, a statement from the MAFS team read: ‘All our thanks to Trisha for the extraordinary contribution she has made to the success of #MAFS!’

Changes: Last year, angry fans expressed outrage over the role, or lack thereof, Trisha, and fellow experts John Aiken (far right), Mel Schilling (far left) played in the 2020 season

Changes: Last year, angry fans expressed outrage over the role, or lack thereof, Trisha, and fellow experts John Aiken (far right), Mel Schilling (far left) played in the 2020 season

Changes: Last year, angry fans expressed outrage over the role, or lack thereof, Trisha, and fellow experts John Aiken (far right), Mel Schilling (far left) played in the 2020 season

Last year, angry fans expressed outrage over the role, or lack thereof, Trisha, and fellow experts John Aiken, Mel Schilling played in the 2020 season. 

Daily Mail Australia first reported that producers had decided to shake things up by introducing a ‘sex therapist’ on the expert panel for the next season.  

Trish has been replaced by Alessandra Rampolla, 46, a clinical sexologist from Puerto Rico. 

Racy days ahead: Trish has been replaced by Alessandra Rampolla, 46, (pictured) a clinical sexologist from Puerto Rico

Racy days ahead: Trish has been replaced by Alessandra Rampolla, 46, (pictured) a clinical sexologist from Puerto Rico

Racy days ahead: Trish has been replaced by Alessandra Rampolla, 46, (pictured) a clinical sexologist from Puerto Rico

Source: Daily Mail Australia | World News

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