NewsColony
Image default
News

Wildlife warriors are desperate to catch a magpie ‘murderer’ as birds drop dead in locals backyards

An increasing amount of dead magpies found on a single street has shocked wildlife rescue volunteers.

Rescue volunteers were called twice daily to a street in Southport to help sick and dying magpies over a two week period. 

The magpies are believed to have been poisoned over the last few months. 

In shocking footage some birds can be seen having seizures.

Wildlife rescue volunteers were called twice daily for a two week period to help sick and dying magpies along a single street in Southport, birds being poisoned in the last few months

Wildlife rescue volunteers were called twice daily for a two week period to help sick and dying magpies along a single street in Southport, birds being poisoned in the last few months

Wildlife rescue volunteers were called twice daily for a two week period to help sick and dying magpies along a single street in Southport, birds being poisoned in the last few months

In distressing footage of the poisoned birds, some magpies can be seen having seizures

In distressing footage of the poisoned birds, some magpies can be seen having seizures

Dozens of magpies have dropped dead in local residents backyards and driveways

Dozens of magpies have dropped dead in local residents backyards and driveways

In distressing footage of the poisoned birds, some magpies can be seen having seizures

Wildcard spokeswoman Tara Hunter told the Gold Coast Bulletin that of the rescued birds, half of them survived while half had to be euthanised. 

Ms Hunter called the bizarre string of deaths on Crinium Cresent as ‘incredibly concerning’. 

‘We do see deaths occur naturally at times but this situation was different, our hotline was being called twice a day all to pick up birds in the same street’. 

Ms Hunter said the magpie deaths could be due to a chemical spill or a type of contamination, but shares the concern of local residents that the poisoning was intentional. 

Disturbed Southport resident Tony Hopkins created a newsletter to send to the local community titled ‘Catch a killer: Is your neighbour a murderer?’ 

The newsletter, which aimed to find out more information about the deaths and guess at potential leads, named the killer an ‘uneducated idiot’. 

Concerned local Tony Hopkins distributed this newsletter throughout the Southport area, only 4 or 5 magpies remain on the street with locals saddened by the eerie silence

Concerned local Tony Hopkins distributed this newsletter throughout the Southport area, only 4 or 5 magpies remain on the street with locals saddened by the eerie silence

Concerned local Tony Hopkins distributed this newsletter throughout the Southport area, only 4 or 5 magpies remain on the street with locals saddened by the eerie silence

While some residents wondered if the magpies were killed to prevent attacks on passer-bys, Mr Hopkins said the ‘extremely friendly’ birds did not swoop and had lived in the Southport area for decades. 

Mr Hopkins said workers at the nearby Currumbin Wildlife Sanctuary couldn’t solve the mystery of how the magpies had died.  

The suspicious deaths are currently under investigation by the RSPCA and the Queensland Department of Environment and Science.  

Queenslanders can be landed with a $1000 fine for killing a magpie, while killing ten or more of the birds can result in a $100,000 fine and a year in jail.  

One online commentator suggested those responsible needed ‘a peck on the head’ while another said the magpie murderer needed to be found and locked up. 

‘What sort of monster hurts defenceless birds. Karma incoming’. 

Residents say magpie families have lived in Southport for decades and are extremely friendly

Residents say magpie families have lived in Southport for decades and are extremely friendly

Residents say magpie families have lived in Southport for decades and are extremely friendly

WHY DO MAGPIES SWOOP?

Magpies swoop to protect their young, and swoop at dogs, cats and humans 

The colour of people’s clothes, the speed they are travelling or a noise they make can trigger a magpie to swoop

Some magpies are aggressive towards humans because of past harassment

It is important to never throw things at or chase a magpie, instead it is advised to walk slowly through the birds territory or take a different route

Source: NSW Government  

<!—->Advertisement

Source: Daily Mail Australia | World News

Related posts

Britain faces Credit Crunch II: Banks set to pull back from lending

NewsColony

Lady Pamela skipper fined $4500 for lying to border authorities

NewsColony

Earl and Countess of Wessex meet famous alpacas on city farm visit

NewsColony

Leave a Comment