Did your running bug die off too quickly? You’re not alone. 

Studies suggest that around a third of people who sign up to run a marathon drop out. 

And as many as two thirds of those who start any exercise programme, including regular running, stop after six months.

But experts say there is one mistake made by most runners that makes it very tough for them to persevere.

Quite simply, they’re going much too fast.

Around half of people who take up running get injured in the first year, which some experts say is partly explained by beginners' thirst for speed.

Around half of people who take up running get injured in the first year, which some experts say is partly explained by beginners' thirst for speed.

Around half of people who take up running get injured in the first year, which some experts say is partly explained by beginners’ thirst for speed.

In an Instagram post that has received more than 4,500 likes, New York-based physical therapist Dr Victoria Sekely warned that most runners are ‘limiting potential’ by going ‘too hard’ on every run.

She points to a quote from popular personal trainer Chris Johnson, which states that 80 percent of runners run at 80 percent intensity 80 percent of the time. 

‘A lot of runners think that if they don’t run hard, then they haven’t done anything,’ Dr Sekley told Stylist.

‘What’s the point in running easy, in doing something that doesn’t feel hard?’ 

But, she explains, ‘running too much at a high intensity puts a lot of stress on your body and doesn’t allow for you to fully recover. 

‘You will not be able to perform at your best on your speed days or long run days.’ 

Sekely suggests runners should follow the 80/20 rule: ensuring 80 percent of your weekly mileage is easy, and 20 percent is at a harder pace or effort.

She says that slowing down can in fact result in you speeding up without realizing, and with much less effort. 

Research from Gothenberg University in Sweden suggests almost half of the recreational runners get injured over the course of a year, with the most common issues involving the knee and the Achilles tendon and calf area.

Dr Sekely suggests this may be due to runners’ tendencies to run far too fast when they first start out.

And if you think reducing your pace makes you lazy, think again. 

‘See your easy run as a way to improve your speed by slowing down first in order to speed up on those harder run days – it’s easier to stick that plan,’ she says.

‘You’ll see that tomorrow is your easy run so you need to take it easy because the day after, you’ve got a speed run scheduled when you can go really hard and reach your goals.’

Source: Mail Online

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